Tag Archives: 19th-Century

Hard Facts on the Origins of “Hard” Cider

In the last two posts we looked at the etymology of the word cider and the various spellings of cider in English. This post will look at the meaning of the “hard” in hard cider.

In 1840 presidential candidate William Henry Harrison ran his “Log Cabin & Hard Cider” Campaign. Essentially he claimed he was raised in a humble a log cabin drinking common cider.

While his campaign claims weren’t accurate, the campaign was a success on several levels. Harrison became the 9th president and the term “hard cider” became more common in American English. It’s now so firmly embedded in our language that today it’s what we call almost all fermented apple juice. Americans are the only ones in the English-speaking world to use that term. Everywhere else it’s just called cider. Early Americans left off the hard too. From the earliest settlement through the nineteenth century it was simply called cider. So when did it get to be “hard”?

As it turns out, “hard cider” isn’t originally American. It appears to be British. The earliest reference to “hard cider” found so far is in the 1690 A New Dictionary of the Terms Ancient and Modern of the Canting Crew dictionary, printed in London. It’s in the definition for Freeze, which is

1690 1
1690 2

Freeze is cheap cider used to adulterate good wine. This definition is repeated verbatim in British dictionaries throughout the eighteenth century, including

A New Canting Dictionary, 1725

The New Universal English Dictionary, 1761

The New Universal Etymological English Dictionary, 1775

A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1785

Blackguardiana; or, a Dictionary of Rogues, Bawds, &c., 1795

The definition for freeze, being “thin, small, hard” is curious. Since cider at that time always meant alcoholic apple juice, those words seem to be describing the character of cider. In looking up other early definitions for “hard” one finds the usual definition of firmness. Some dictionaries, though, defined it as rough. A few even defined it as a rough characteristic of drinks.

A New English Dictionary, John Kersey’s 1739 dictionary, defines hard as

1739 A New English Dictionary

 

Samuel Johnson’s 1755 A Dictionary of the English Language has several definitions for hard, including

1755 1
1755 2

 

In 1789 Thomas Sheridan in his A Complete Dictionary of the English Language defined hard as

1789 sheridan

 

Noah Webster’s 1828 An American Dictionary of the English Language not only defines hard as a character of liquors, he uses cider in his example sentence:

1828 Webster

 

According to these definitions the “hard” in hard cider has nothing to do with alcohol content, but with taste.

Hard cider doesn’t appear in American records until 1786, when The New-York Packet included it in a cure for dropsy (an archaic term for edema).(1)

New-York Packet, published as Loudon's New-York Packet (New York, New York) • 02-02-1786 • Page [2]
New-York Packet, published as Loudon’s New-York Packet (New York, New York) 02-02-1786 Page [2]

After the Packet published it in 1786, “hard cider” only occasionally appeared in print over the next forty years. When it did, the story suggests the cider is low-quality.(2) For example, in 1790, when a resident of Charleston, South Carolina realized the state capital would remain in Columbia, he worried that Charlestonians would be reduced to a less civilized lifestyle, including having only hard cider to drink.

1790 Hard Cyder
Daily Advertiser, published as The Daily Advertiser (New York, New York) 06-11-1790 Page [2]

The overall tone of John Woodger’s 1804 obituary suggests he preferred an exceedingly unrefined lifestyle, appropriately choosing hard cider over everything else.

1804 Hard Cyder
Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser, published as Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) 12-27-1804 Page [3]

Why use good cider for vinegar making when hard “cyder” would be less expensive, as Jona Rogers advertised in 1826.

Baltimore Patriot, published as BALTIMORE PATRIOT & MERCANTILE ADVERTISER. (Baltimore, Maryland) • 06-09-1826 • Page [3]
Baltimore Patriot, published as BALTIMORE PATRIOT & MERCANTILE ADVERTISER. (Baltimore, Maryland) 06-09-1826 Page [3]

This fictional 1830 humorous piece calls hard cider “dreadful.”

Haverhill Gazette, published as Essex Gazette (Haverhill, Massachusetts) • 04-10-1830 • Page [3]
Haverhill Gazette, published as Essex Gazette (Haverhill, Massachusetts) 04-10-1830 Page [3]

One ne’er-do-well trader included hard cider among his limited and poor stock.

North American, published as The North American (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) • 04-17-1839 • Page [1]
North American, published as The North American (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) 04-17-1839 Page [1]

 

This understanding of “hard” as rough, sour, or acidic adds a new layer to understanding Harrison’s campaign. He didn’t simply claim to drink cider. He claimed to drink the cheapest, harshest cider, just like the people did who he appealed to.(3)

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire) • 02-10-1840 • Page [2]

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire) 02-10-1840 Page [2]

None of this is to say that Americans only called it hard cider after 1840. Cider continued to be used well into the nineteenth century as the name of fermented apple juice. What remains unclear is when the word cider came to mean fresh juice and when hard cider exclusively meant fermented juice. That search continues.

************************************

  1. As the image shows, they reprinted this from the Albany Gazette. A copy of that has yet to be located. However, it began publication in 1784, not long before the Packet reprinted the cure.
  2. Following their original publication, the dropsy cure and the Mr. Longswallow piece were repeatedly reprinted in various American papers over several years. I chose not to include each reference to them here.
  3. Like hard, the word cabin had a specific meaning too. It meant a one-room structure.
Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Cider

Upcoming Talk on Cider & Prohibition

catsmeowFINALlogo-1

Click here for more information.

On Saturday, October 7th at 1 pm I’m presenting an original talk, “Did Prohibition Prohibit Cider?” at the Sigal Museum in Easton, PA in connection with their new exhibition, The Cat’s Meow: Lehigh Valley in the Age of Art Deco & the Roaring Twenties.

Prohibition is often blamed for abruptly ending American cider, yet it didn’t change our taste for beer, wine, or spirits. Come find out how Prohibition did and did not change cidermaking in Pennsylvania.

Leave a comment

Filed under Cider

Cider Helps Sway the Election

The candidate, himself a wealthy man, convinced the country that his opponent was a snob who could never understand real Americans. As proof the candidate said his opponent didn’t like hard cider.

It was the election of 1840, and William Henry Harrison was running his
Log Cabin & Hard Cider” campaign against incumbent Martin Van Buren. As you might imagine, Harrison’s campaign created a plethora of log house- and hard cider-related art.

A favorite among them is this not-so-subtle mechanical card

van-buren

Left:
A BEAUTIFUL GOBLET OF
WHITE HOUSE CHAMPAGNE

pull the tab at the bottom and it changes the image to

Right:
AN UGLY MUG OF
LOG-CABIN HARD CIDER
Special Collections Research Center
Syracuse University Library

His campaign worked and Harrison became our 9th president.

Leave a comment

Filed under Cider

Nineteenth Century Grafting Recreated

As it’s spring, the season of grafting, here’s a little living history from the folks up at Genesee Country Village & Museum.

Leave a comment

Filed under Cider

Irish Apples & Cider

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

In celebration of the day check out this overview of Irish cider culture then & now:

A Brief History of Apples and Cidermaking in Ireland

https://i0.wp.com/newsdron.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Picture-Of-St-Patrick6.jpg

He’ll have one more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Cider

Cyder Season 2015: 21.5 Gallons Going and New Tools For Old Cydermaking

Welcome to Pommel’s fourth cyder season! Last week I started several cyders, some old favorites and some new experiments. They are, from left to right:

2015 Class Picture

  • 6.5 gallons of the 1723 honey wheat cyser (so far this one remains a fan favorite) – Potential ABV 11.5%
  • 1 gallon unchaptalized raw juice (cause I hate to waste fermentable juice) – Potential ABV 7%
  • 6 gallons of the 1674 Penn spiced cyder – Potential ABV 8%
  • 5 gallons for experimenting with fortifying and royaling – Potential ABV 7%
  • 3 gallons raw Golden Russet (another house favorite) – Potential ABV 8.5%

All of them are fermenting with natural yeast only.

This season I’ve started using brew buckets. They’re certainly not historical, but they are more cost-effective than oak barrels. They allowed me to double production without doubling the expense. The juice will stay in the buckets for a few weeks before being transferred to glass carboys to condition for a few months.

Useful as the buckets are, I wish they

  • Had a clear side or top to show fermentation
  • Had their upper gallons marked (these are all 6.5 gallon buckets, but the printed markings only go to 5)
  • Were wooden barrels
Brewbucket Gallons

At least one of those wishes I could immediately grant myself. Seems a 6.5-gallon bucket will hold 7, so long as I don’t need too much head space.

 

I also purchased a digital scale which should cut down on the various mathematical conversions I’ve been doing. Though a stillard and scale would be more accurate (historically speaking).

stillards-scale-001

The stillard (aka stilliard or steelyard) is the long object on the upper left and the scale is on the right.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Cider

Applejack & The Raven Black

Still not sure what applejack (distilled hard cider) and chicken feed have in common, but I’m assuming the company supported Temperance, which also might explain why it ends so unhappily.

fritz spindle shanks cards151. Fritz Spindle-Shanks The Raven Black, Takes kindly to the applejack.
2. Its taste is sweet, he thrusts his beak, into the liquor stiff and sleek.

fritz spindle shanks cards143. He takes a nip and with delight, it gurgles slowly out of sight.
4. Immerse his beak again goes back, into the glass of applejack.

fritz spindle shanks cards135. The glass is raised, his spirit pains, to think that nothing more remains.
6. Whew! Whew! He feels so very queer, with silly look and slinking leer.

fritz spindle shanks cards127. And screams with wild delight possessed, thus on three toes he blandly rests.
8. But wantonness too often tends, to show the moral of such ends.

fritz spindle shanks cards119. Thus roughly yanks with vulgar haste, these articles of female taste.
10. He takes a flop and spindle shanks, will ne’re again renew his pranks.

Fritz Spindle-Shanks, the Raven Black, on trade cards for Peel’s Improved Poultry Food (New York: New York News Company, 1882]). Set of 10 trade cards. Graphic Arts Collection. Gift of Allen Scheuch, Class of 1976.

Leave a comment

Filed under Cider