Racking Perry Into Secondary

On Thursday past I racked off the four test batches of perry I started a month ago. They began like this:

They are, l-r:
Knudsen juice & WL cider yeast
Gerber juice & WL cider yeast
Knudsen juice & Nottingham ale yeast
Gerber juice & Nottingham ale yeast

After fermenting for a month they look like this:

They are still, l-r:
Knudsen juice & WL cider yeast
Gerber juice & WL cider yeast
Knudsen juice & Nottingham ale yeast
Gerber juice & Nottingham ale yeast

As usual, there was a quick tasting to see where things were. Never having made perry until now and only ever having real perry once or twice, I don’t have much to go on. Like so many test batches before, I was just hoping they were potable at this stage (after bottling my baseline will be that they don’t suck. I have such high standards).

So, you ask, how are they? Well the answer is dependent on the juice (and the drinker, but that’s not important right now). The unfiltered Knudsen batches were dry with a hint of pear. The filtered Gerber juices fermented thin and bland. It’ll be interesting to see how they change between now and when they’re bottled.

These will now wait for six months to bulk condition before they’re bottled. From the few perry-making sources I’ve found it seems perry tends to be bulk aged a little longer than cider to allow the warmth of the late spring/early summer to help soften the tartness.

With these four racked off everything at the cydery is sitting in secondary fermentation, which means there’s nothing else to be done for a while. Now I can turn my attention to some of the research I’ve been collecting. Or I could start another test batch. There’s no room for another gallon in the kitchen, but the downstairs bathroom is wide open…

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Cider

2 responses to “Racking Perry Into Secondary

  1. blackledgewinery

    Do you have a photo of what they look like post racking? How much head space is there?

    Like

    • There’s certainly more headspace in the Knudsen juices than is recommended (you can see the foggy layer on the bottom in the images above, which I didn’t include in the racking). The Gerbers are just below the one galllon mark on the jugs, which is as high as most of the previous ciders I’ve made.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s